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Colossus
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 480

Colossus

With an introductory essay on cryptography and the history of code-breaking by Simon Singh, this book reveals the workings of Colossus and the extraordinary staff at Bletchley Park through personal accounts by those who lived and worked with the computer.

Colossus
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 592

Colossus

Now in paperback, this is the last untold story of Bletchley Park. Using recently declassified information, Paul Gannon has written a gripping account of the invention of the world's first true computer, Colossus.

The history of British army signals in the second world war
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 377
Beam Antenna Handbook
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 268

Beam Antenna Handbook

This new edition, a must for the serious DXer, presents complete information on beam design, construction, and operation, and describes tests to detect if a beam is working properly.

The Hut Six Story
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 263

The Hut Six Story

None

Radio Amateurs World Atlas
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 19

Radio Amateurs World Atlas

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 1994
  • -
  • Publisher: Unknown

None

Organising the Propaganda Instrument: The British Experience
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 127

Organising the Propaganda Instrument: The British Experience

The systematic use of propaganda is very much a phenomenon of the 20th century. Through the years, kings, political leaders, and statesmen have often made use of what might now be called "propaganda tech niques" but it is only within the present century that the use of pro paganda has been developed as a systematic instrument of national and foreign policy. Nonetheless, since World War II propaganda has become a regular peacetime instrument of foreign policy for most states, be they large or small. While some considerable attention has been given to the propaganda organisations and activities of the United States and certain Com munist nations, especially the U.S.S.R., relatively little has been done on the British approach to propaganda. The present study attempts to at least partially fill that vacuum. A history of the overseas Informa tion Services is not undertaken and I will leave that important task to future scholars. Instead I have examined the British approach to the organisation of propaganda and the mechanics they have developed to utilize this instrument of foreign policy.